Talk:Taurine

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Former good articleTaurine was one of the Natural sciences good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
January 1, 2007Good article nomineeListed
January 11, 2009Good article reassessmentDelisted
Current status: Delisted good article

Content Request: Use in energy drink naming[edit]

Is this how red bull got the bull in Red Bull?

2601:84:C701:411E:748C:4C02:AB9F:E0FB (talk) 01:56, 5 October 2017 (UTC)

Content Request: Use in energy drinks[edit]

Why is taurine included in energy drinks? This has got to be a common reason for visits to this page. Is there any scientific data on this? If not, there should at least be a summary of current thought on the matter, perhaps a quote from an industry expert who says "in our experience, blah blah". This article should have a new section for this topic. Can a subject matter expert help? __ø(._. ) Patrick("\(.:...:.)/")Fisher 21:23, 23 January 2012 (UTC) lol lol lol Death

Taurine concentration decreases in all skeletal muscles after exercise. The thought is that taurine enhances structural contractile capabilities in the muscle itself and high muscle concentrations of taurine aid high performance athletes. --Quartet 23:22, 23 January 2012 (UTC)
I can say you only one thing: It works! Probably, not for a long time, not with a large amount, but one bottle of energy drink with taurine can bring you much lighter than even coffee. Moreover, there is thousands of articles that saying that coffee - is evil, it works too hard for brain, and even more, zombies were making with coffee if you want to believe old tales from africa. Probably, we will meet more and more similar articles for taurine in the future, but for just now - this is a best way to move your cheerfulness from 18:00 to 22:00 just with one bottle 0.5. Who knows, is it much safer for health than coffee, please append. However, right now I'm drinking coffee after 2 hours of taurine, and plus I'm pretty drunk with 4L Guinness, now behind me another one 2L of Guinness, and coffee must safe me against it. Lastly, taurine given me a power to make this jerk and I'm pretty clear to write this shit, but engrish not is my native language. Cheers! 213.59.138.182 (talk) 14:28, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Infant formulas[edit]

I believe that the following sentence (under Other Uses) is somewhat misleading regarding the content of the cited reference:

However, this practice [taurine supplementation of infant formula] has never been rigorously studied, and as such it has yet to be proven to be necessary, or even beneficial

The reference supports taurine supplementation. It presents evidence of beneficial effects of such supplementation, and no evidence of any detrimental effect. The only negative comment was that there had been only one randomized trial of this practice, and it was questionable that there would be others due to ethical concerns. The reason there are ethical concerns is that taurine is considered to be beneficial, and denial of taurine to infants even for research is probably detrimental, hence may be unethical.

Good reference, but the statement needs to be modified, perhaps to something like the following:

However, despite some evidence of benefits from taurine supplementation, recent recommendations for the content of full-term infant formulas do not specify a minimum level of taurine, due to the lack of randomized controlled trials. --Btcva (talk) 03:48, 21 April 2012 (UTC)

I'm sorry if this is not the right place to ask this but the article says the EFSA found no adverse effects for 1000mg of taurine per kg of body weight per day. Am I to assume that a normal person say 100kg can drink 100 energy drinks a day? Thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.97.166.130 (talk) 21:19, 29 May 2012 (UTC)

Not sure how you draw that correlation. Energy drinks and taurine are not the same thing. Energy drinks contain caffeine, b-vitamins and other ingredients aside from taurine that would obviously prohibit the ingestion of 100 of them a day.--Quartet 14:10, 24 August 2012 (UTC)

Lowers blood pressure ref[edit]

Rather than trying to find a reference for the article's sentence, "There is also evidence that taurine is beneficial for adult human blood pressure and possibly, the alleviation of other cardiovascular ailments (in humans suffering essential hypertension, taurine supplementation resulted in measurable decreases in blood pressure).[citation needed]," how about citing Balch's taurine claims in her home remedies book

<ref>{{cite web |last=Balch |first=Phyllis A. |year= 2006 |url=http://books.google.com/books?id=2s_q2y_J3rwC&q=taurine#v=snippet&q=taurine&f=false |title=Prescription for Nutritional Healing |format=googlebooks preview |page=60 |publisher=Penguin |accessdate=2012}}</ref>

and stating that Balch says taurine is a remedy for high blood pressure? - 173.24.245.10 (talk) 17:13, 2 September 2012 (UTC)

Also, WebMD states, "Researchers aren’t exactly sure why taurine seems to help congestive heart failure (CHF). There is some evidence that it improves the function of the left ventricle, one of the chambers of the heart. Taurine might also improve heart failure because it seems to lower blood pressure and calm the sympathetic nervous system, which is often too active in people with high blood pressure and CHF. The sympathetic nervous system is the part of the nervous system that responds to stress." http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1024-TAURINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=1024&activeIngredientName=TAURINE - 173.24.245.10 (talk) 18:01, 2 September 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 23 February 2013[edit]

Huxtable RJ (1992) Physiological actions of taurine. Physiol Rev 72:101–163 this is the reference for the first citation: (It is a major constituent of bile and can be found in the large intestine and accounts for approximately 0.1% of total human body weight) 109.171.137.211 (talk) 14:20, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

 Done. Thank you for your help improving the article. -- Ed (Edgar181) 17:59, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

Request to review taurine rumors[edit]

There is a hoax that started on social media about energy drinks containing bull semen or bull urine. All one would have to do is use a search engine to verify this. Here's 1 of 10 links I found debunking this hoax. http://www.hoax-slayer.com/energy-drinks-bull-sperm-warning.shtml — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.210.49.190 (talk) 03:16, 23 December 2014 (UTC)

Taurine has been claimed by many to have toxic effects in the media, and there are many stipulations that taurine in Red Bull has been taken from bull semen. I think that we should clear this up for the parents and kids who look up ingredients of marketed energy drinks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.36.132.254 (talk) 21:06, 19 April 2013 (UTC)

Claimed by many? Who? The article already shows that there are no adverse effects for up to 1,000 mg of taurine per kilogram of body weight per day. I think the only people who claim it's toxic are self published individuals who are not qualified to make such statements. It's also not Wikipedia's job to address fringe theories, rumors and urban legends - in particular those on particlar brands (when this isn't that brand's article). --Quartet 20:40, 22 April 2013 (UTC)
Where is that 1,000 mg/Kg thig mentioned? It's not in the Toxicity section. --Jcayzac (talk) 07:57, 27 December 2015 (UTC)

Is taurine an amino acid?[edit]

Eventually, is tauine an amino acid? The article does not provide evidence against. Many manufacturers of dietary supplements advertise it as a sulphur-containing amino acid. See also https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12514918 688dim (talk) 19:49, 23 September 2013 (UTC)

No, it is not an amino acid. Amino acids have carbonyl groups. The Wikipedia [amino_acid] page explains that. Kd4ttc (talk) 19:16, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

Amino acid Kd4ttc (talk) 19:19, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

Regarding claims under physiological functions[edit]

Someone should really take a hard look at the claims that are made, supported by dubious studies, under the physiological functions section. E.g. the claim "Additionally, supplementation with taurine has been shown to prevent oxidative stress induced by exercise." cites a study that had eleven participants. 78.72.162.175 (talk) 20:11, 17 October 2013 (UTC)

Taurine in energy drinks[edit]

Taurine is in many energy drinks but is mainly known for ‘Red Bull’ as it began accompanying with bulls’ semen otherwise known as ‘sperm’ or ‘ejaculation’. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2A01:4C8:C3E:4FFB:4442:97C0:410A:6C83 (talk) 14:20, 3 June 2019 (UTC) "Taurine is regularly used as an ingredient in energy drinks, with many containing 1000 mg per serving,[14] and some as much as 2000 mg.[15]"

Should be moved under dietary intake section? I'm unable to do it as I'm not registered. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.232.36.77 (talk) 23:32, 8 November 2013 (UTC)

Toxicity section, please fix unsubstantiated claim of psoriasis induction by taurine[edit]

In the Toxicity section, please change "There is an indication that taurine (2 g/day) has some function in the maintenance and possibly in the induction of psoriasis." to, "There is an indication that taurine (2 g/day) has some function in the maintenance and possibly in the induction of psoriasis.[citation needed] This claim has not been substantiated and is questioned in numerous studies.[1],[2],[3] Relavation (talk) 21:42, 19 November 2013 (UTC)

Not done: That claim is supported (almost verbatim; should be reworded) by the citation at the end of the paragraph. Regards, Celestra (talk) 05:24, 20 November 2013 (UTC)

Thank you Celestra. Please note that the evidence given in the reference at the end of the Toxicity section is from an opinion paper and not data based. The reason given for that almost verbatim statement in the opinion paper, is a single reference to an initial study by Roe done in 1966. Later research contradicted Roe's findings. The opinion paper was not properly informed. The three references I gave, which overturn the conclusions of Roe, were data based, in rebuttal to, and published AFTER Roe. Please note the following:

From the first reference (1968): "(3).CONCLUSIONS The results of this study fail to support the thesis that taurine is of etiological importance in psoriasis... Despite this, only 2, of whom one was on 990 mg for 4 weeks, became worse. This is hardly less than would be expected in view of the periodic remissions and exacerbations to be expected in psoriasis, particularly in outpatients in a 2 to 4 week period."

From the second reference (1982): "In our study, the conditions of only one of 13 patients taking large daily doses of taurine became noticeably worse, and thus we could not confirm Roe's findings."

From the third reference (1969): "Results of this study fail to support the concept that a low-protein, low-taurine, or low-tryptophan diet is of value in the management of psoriasis." This is not a matter of actual dispute, but rather of an old study coming to a wrong conclusion which is then corrected by later work. Please help stop this old wives' tale! Thank you.

Perhaps a better rewording for the article would be: Cut the sentence about Taurine being involved in the maintenance and induction of psoriasis, and replace it with:

"Although an early study proposed that taurine might be involved in the maintenance and etiology of psoriasis, later studies failed to find a significant correlation."

[4],[5],[6] Relavation (talk) 07:41, 20 November 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ "Taurine and Psoriasis", Herschel S Zackheim MD and Eugene M Farber MD, The Journal of Investigative Dermatology (1968) 50, 227–230; doi:10.1038/jid.1968.32 http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v50/n3/full/jid196832a.html
  2. ^ "Taurine and Diet in Psoriasis", Herschel S. Zackheim, MD, Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(12):961. doi:10.1001/archderm.1982.01650240005005. http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=543725
  3. ^ "Low-Protein Diet and Psoriasis A Hospital Study", Herschel S. Zackheim, MD; Eugene M. Farber, MD Arch Dermatol. 1969;99(5):580-586. doi:10.1001/archderm.1969.01610230072012. http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=530951
  4. ^ "Taurine and Psoriasis", Herschel S Zackheim MD and Eugene M Farber MD, The Journal of Investigative Dermatology (1968) 50, 227–230; doi:10.1038/jid.1968.32 http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v50/n3/full/jid196832a.html
  5. ^ "Taurine and Diet in Psoriasis", Herschel S. Zackheim, MD, Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(12):961. doi:10.1001/archderm.1982.01650240005005. http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=543725
  6. ^ "Low-Protein Diet and Psoriasis A Hospital Study", Herschel S. Zackheim, MD; Eugene M. Farber, MD Arch Dermatol. 1969;99(5):580-586. doi:10.1001/archderm.1969.01610230072012. http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=530951

Not done: We shouldn't remove well-sourced claims. If you want to add some neutral text to the effect that three later studies failed to support Roe's findings, that would be fine. I am concerned by your characterizing a study as an "opinion piece" or "old wives' tale". Even if the older study is not supported by later studies, that doesn't invalidate the earlier study, it just casts some doubt on the findings. Thanks, Celestra (talk) 19:43, 20 November 2013 (UTC)


Calling it an opinion piece was just description, from the title: "Opinion on Caffeine, Taurine and D-Glucurono - g -Lactone as constituents of so-called "energy" drinks (expressed on 21 January 1999)".

The claim of psoriasis induction by taurine had only one source, which was the small initial study by Roe (based on just 5 psoriatic patients). This claim ignored several later, larger studies which did not find any such correlation.

How about this, without characterization, and in a neutral voice -

After the sentence:

"There is an indication that taurine (2 g/day) has some function in the maintenance and possibly in the induction of psoriasis." Please add:

Later, larger studies failed to find correlation between taurine intake and psoriasis.[1],[2],[3]

Thank you Celestra. Relavation (talk) 15:14, 21 November 2013 (UTC)

How about:
"A 1962 study found an indication ... . Three later studies failed to support that finding."
That is as neutral as possible. I'd like to avoid "larger" without an independent source making the claim; it may or may not be larger in a meaningful way and biases the reader. Likewise, including the number of studies avoids making it sound as though all later studies disagree (or all previous studies, in the case of the change to "a 1962 study"). If you agree, I'll implement it this evening. Thanks, Celestra (talk) 18:47, 21 November 2013 (UTC)


That's fine, thank you Celestra. Just one thing - the original (small) study by D.A. Roe was 1966 instead of 1962. I hope you will be able to include the references to the three later studies. I believe I formatted them properly in my last edit, though I cannot preview the results. Thank you, and have a very good evening. Relavation (talk) 22:31, 22 November 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Herschel S Zackheim MD and Eugene M Farber MD, (1968). "Taurine and Psoriasis." The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 50, 227–230; doi:10.1038/jid.1968.32 [ http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v50/n3/full/jid196832a.html]
  2. ^ Herschel S. Zackheim, MD, (1982),"Taurine and Diet in Psoriasis". Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(12):961. doi:10.1001/archderm.1982.01650240005005. [1]
  3. ^ Herschel S. Zackheim, MD; Eugene M. Farber, MD, (1969). "Low-Protein Diet and Psoriasis A Hospital Study." Arch Dermatol. 1969;99(5):580-586.doi:10.1001/archderm.1969.01610230072012. [2]
Done Thanks for catching my error regarding the year. I reformatted the references to use our {{cite journal}} template for consistency. If you want to preview the appearance of the citations in the future, use {{reflist|close=1}} after the text. (I have added several above.) The "close=1" argument causes the references not to be carried past that list into a subsequent list. Regards and thanks for improving the article, Celestra (talk) 22:15, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

The reference to the 1966 article is a review that referenced the paper. The original paper was a well done metabolic study that described Taurine administration causing Pruitt is is patients with psoriasis. It raised a question of etiology given development of plaques and noting that there was evidence of Taurine in the plaques. I think the reference should be the original reference J Invest Dermatol. 1966 Apr;46(4):420-30 with a link to the online accessible version which I’ve included here. https://www.jidonline.org/article/S0022-202X(15)47104-0/pdf Kd4ttc (talk) 19:53, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

Sorry I got spelcheked. Should be pruritis not Pruitt Kd4ttc (talk) 19:55, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

Disambiguous?[edit]

tau·rine [tawr-ahyn, -in] adjective

  1. of, pertaining to, or resembling a bull.
  2. pertaining to the zodiacal sign Taurus.

--2601:0:8A80:8AF:0:0:0:1001 (talk) 17:18, 17 February 2014 (UTC)

Reference 20[edit]

The reference 20 leads to a redirected page with spam. I do not have the credentials to edit. Thanks in advance for fixing that. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.131.52.87 (talk) 18:37, 6 June 2014 (UTC)

Thanks for catching the problem and reporting it here. I have changed the link to another website that hosts what appears to be the same article. It has lots of ads, but at least it is better than the previous one which no longer works. -- Ed (Edgar181) 19:01, 6 June 2014 (UTC)

How much do humans make a day[edit]

Article says taurine is made in the pancreas (from cysteine) but doesn't says roughly how much (in adult humans). Is anything known about what affects the rate of synthesis and routes of excretion or degradation ? (so we can compare with what might be absorbed from dietary taurine) ? - Rod57 (talk) 21:12, 17 January 2015 (UTC)

Vitamin B12–dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass seems to imply mice make it in the liver if they have sufficient B12. - Rod57 (talk) 21:18, 17 January 2015 (UTC)

Taurine is one of the most common molecules in the human body. The average human contains ~1/2oz of Taurine, or, according the second sentence of the article currently, perhaps even close to 3 ounces. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.124.116.101 (talk) 12:16, 7 February 2019 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 4 August 2015[edit]

Under the heading 'Nutritional significance', 3rd sentence, I believe it should be changed from "Evidence indicates taurine is beneficial for adult human blood pressure and possibly, the alleviation of other cardiovascular ailments (in humans suffering essential hypertension, taurine supplementation resulted in measurable decreases in blood pressure)" to "Evidence indicates taurine may be acutely beneficial for blood pressure in male rats. A single intravenous taurine supplementation resulted in measurable decreases in blood pressure. However, when rats were supplemented with taurine in their drinking water, females rats only showed an increase in blood pressure. Both genders showed significant tachycardia."

Both references state this [1] [2] and there was no mention of humans involved in the study.

References

14.2.185.225 (talk) 12:27, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. It's a real long stretch to say that study indicates human benefit; the abstract doesn't mention humans at all. Copyedited slightly. Ivanvector 🍁 (talk) 16:17, 4 August 2015 (UTC)

Boiling point[edit]

Why is it's boiling point O'malley. LOl wtf!? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 18.111.76.102 (talk) 02:26, 30 October 2015 (UTC)

It may have been part of a reference that got misplaced. In any case, I have removed it. -- Ed (Edgar181) 13:22, 19 November 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 18 November 2015[edit]

Under the Biosynthesis section, the last sentence says "It is unclear whether hypotaurine is then spontaneously or enzymatically oxidized to yield taurine." Please change to"Hypotaurine is enzymatically oxidized to yield taurine by hypotaurine dehydrogenase."

This can be referenced here: Sumizu K (1962). "Oxidation of hypotaurine in rat liver". Biochim. Biophys. Acta 63: 210–212. doi:10.1016/0006-3002(62)90357-8. PMID 13979247. Jcrellin (talk) 22:00, 18 November 2015 (UTC)

  •  Done -- Ed (Edgar181) 13:19, 19 November 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 7 April 2016[edit]

In the Safety and toxicity section the article states " A substantial increase in the plasma concentration of growth hormone was reported in some epileptic patients during taurine tolerance testing (oral dose of 50 mg per kg body mass per day), suggesting a potential to stimulate the hypothalamus and to modify neuroendocrine function" without citing a source. Please add the reference: Effects of taurine on seizures and growth hormone release in epileptic patients. Mantovani J, DeVivo DC. Arch Neurol. 1979 Nov;36(11):672-4. PMID: 508122 Full text for subscribers: http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=577988 Blennysalmon (talk) 15:58, 7 April 2016 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done - Thank you for your contribution to Wikipedia. fredgandt 09:04, 14 April 2016 (UTC)

More detail on food sources would be helpful[edit]

Article says "fish and meat" but it would be useful to have mg/kg ranges for various fish and meats. Is there none in chicken eggs ? - Rod57 (talk) 14:55, 20 December 2016 (UTC)

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Overdue for an overhaul[edit]

Many of the citations are animal studies or individual clinical trials. The quality of this article can be improved by finding literature that meets MEDRS. David notMD (talk) 12:33, 18 February 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 6 August 2018[edit]

Definition of amino acid should be corrected. The sentence just before the contents section reads as:

While taurine is sometimes called an amino acid, and indeed is an acid containing an amino group, it is not an amino acid in the usual biochemical meaning of the term, which refers to compounds containing both an amino and a carboxyl group.[3]

However it should be :

While taurine is sometimes called an amino acid, and indeed is an acid containing an amino group, it is not an amino acid in the usual biochemical meaning of the term, which refers to compounds containing both an amino and a carboxyl group in the same carbon atom (i.e. alpha carbon).

REASON: In biochemical meaning, not all molecules containing both carboxyl and amino groups are called amino acids. For instance, biogenic amine of glutamate is GABA which contains COOH and NH3 groups, but they are cond to different carbon atoms. Hence, it is not an amino acid. Luneris (talk) 14:30, 6 August 2018 (UTC)

 Done Reworded, I got what you were trying to say. Fish+Karate 13:19, 7 August 2018 (UTC)

Questioned paragraph[edit]

I removed this paragraph since it make what seems to be biomedical claims:"It also acts as an antioxidant and protects against toxicity of various substances (such as lead and cadmium).<ref>{{cite journal|last1=Green|first1=TR|last2=Fellman|first2=JH|last3=Eicher|first3=AL|last4=Pratt|first4=KL|year=1991|title=Antioxidant role and subcellular location of hypotaurine and taurine in human neutrophils|url=|journal=Biochimica et Biophysica Acta|volume=1073|issue=1|pages=91–7|pmid=1846756|doi=10.1016/0304-4165(91)90187-L}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last1=Gürer|first1=H|last2=Ozgünes|first2=H|last3=Saygin|first3=E|last4=Ercal|first4=N|year=2001|title=Antioxidant effect of taurine against lead-induced oxidative stress|url=http://web.mst.edu/~nercal/documents/publications/42.pdf|journal=Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology|volume=41|issue=4|pages=397–402|pmid=11598776|doi=10.1007/s002440010265}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last1=Das|first1=J|last2=Ghosh|first2=J|last3=Manna|first3=P|last4=Sil|first4=PC|year=2008|title=Taurine provides antioxidant defense against NaF-induced cytotoxicity in murine hepatocytes|url=|journal=Pathophysiology|volume=15|issue=3|pages=181–90|doi=10.1016/j.pathophys.2008.06.002|pmid=18676123}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last1=Sinha|first1=M|last2=Manna|first2=P|last3=Sil|first3=PC|year=2008|title=Taurine protects the antioxidant defense system in the erythrocytes of cadmium treated mice|url=|journal=BMB Reports|volume=41|issue=9|pages=657–63|doi=10.5483/BMBRep.2008.41.9.657|pmid=18823590}}</ref> Additionally, supplementation with taurine has been shown to prevent oxidative stress induced by exercise.<ref>{{cite journal|vauthors=Zhang M, Izumi I, Kagamimori S, Sokejima S, Yamagami T, Liu Z, Qi B |title=Role of taurine supplementation to prevent exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy young men|journal=Amino Acids|volume=26|issue=2|year=2004|pages=203–7|pmid=15042451|doi=10.1007/s00726-003-0002-3}}</ref>"--Smokefoot (talk) 15:23, 18 August 2018 (UTC)

Potential addition to the section on Animal Nutrition"[edit]

"FDA Investigating Potential Connection Between Diet and Cases of Canine Heart Disease"

https://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/newsevents/cvmupdates/ucm613305.htm — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.88.41.103 (talk) 21:23, 30 August 2018 (UTC)

Minor edit request re: essential amino acid misteak.[edit]

The article contains the error describing this as an essential amino acid. This is wrong in both that Taurine is not one of the 20 essential amino acids nor is it even an Amino acid. I’d fix it myself but the article is locked. Thanks! Steve : Kd4ttc (talk) 19:24, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

GABA[edit]

Taurine is a potent activator of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171928 http://www.jneurosci.org/content/28/1/106

http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2008/02/scientists-close-taurines-activity-brain "We have discovered that taurine is a strong activator of what are known as GABA [gamma-aminobutyric acid] receptors in a regulatory area of the brain called the thalamus," said study senior author Neil L. Harrison, professor of pharmacology and pharmacology in anesthesiology at WCMC. "We had discovered these receptors two years ago and showed that they interact with the neurotransmitter GABA -- the brain's key inhibitory transmitter -- that is also involved in brain development. It seems that taurine shares these receptors." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.154.73.17 (talk) 14:30, 2 March 2019 (UTC)