Talk:John Wesley

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Former featured article candidateJohn Wesley is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
June 21, 2005Featured article candidateNot promoted
On this day...Facts from this article were featured on Wikipedia's Main Page in the "On this day..." column on May 24, 2004, May 24, 2008, May 24, 2009, May 24, 2010, and May 24, 2013.

Vile Bodies[edit]

I wonder if anyone has thought about adding information about the mention of Wesley in Evelyn Waugh's Vile Bodies? It revolves around a British film crew's attempts to make a film about his life. It's quite an amusing part of the novel and would surely be interesting to add to the "legacy" section of the page.David Rush (talk) 16:39, 15 August 2015 (UTC)[reply]

Ordnance not Ordinance[edit]

This article universally misspells the word ORDNANCE as ORDINANCE. Please refer to any dictionary on the meaning of these two words. Budhen (talk) 22:33, 21 August 2015 (UTC)[reply]

That particular section appears to be a relatively recent addition to the article and it is riddled with errors. I'm removing most of it, as I'm not sure it is entirely relevant to a biography of John Wesley, instead more focused on the Foundry itself. -- Hazhk (talk) 03:14, 22 August 2015 (UTC)[reply]

Beer ad[edit]

A couple of days ago I removed this paragraph. Its only reference was a blog, which is not a reliable source by Wikipedia's standards since it lacks editorial oversight. The content to me seems rather loosely related to Wesley. Al DeFilippo started a discussion on my talk page about this content, but since other editors may also be interested, I'm bringing it here. Al DeFilippo pointed out the 1908 article in the Western Christian Advocate that originally criticized the beer ad and which the blog post is based on. I rather don't think it's particularly reliable by Wikipedia's standards; at best it can be considered the equivalent of an opinion piece.

The temperance movement has widely been written about in reliable published sources. If a beer ad featuring Wesley had been a significamt event that helped crystallize the movement, as Al DeFilippo says, more modern scholarly works would mention or even discuss it. The relevant policies to me seem to be the ones on reliable sources and undue weight of particular aspects of Wesley. Huon (talk) 01:39, 3 November 2015 (UTC)[reply]

Second floor window[edit]

Is this UK usage or US usage. The second floor window in the UK would hardly be in the reach of a man standing on a man's shoulders. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 148.253.221.44 (talk) 08:27, 16 August 2016 (UTC)[reply]

One glass of wine[edit]

This source gives this letter to his mother (emphasis added):

"I have had a great deal of a conversation lately on the subject of Christian liberty, and should be glad of your thoughts as to the several notions of it which good men entertain. I perceive different persons take it in at least six different senses: ...
... (5) Christian liberty is taken by some for a freedom from restraint as to sleep or food. So they would say, your drinking but one glass of wine, or my rising at a fixed hour, was contrary to Christian liberty."

Should this really be taken as evidence that "An early letter makes clear that he drank a glass of wine - though was unusual in restricting himself to that." ? Martinevans123 (talk) 23:49, 11 December 2016 (UTC)[reply]

External links modified[edit]

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this article needs more references[edit]

There are paragraphs throughout the article that do not have any citations whatsoever. Specifically, the following sections:

  • Early life
  • Education
  • Holy Club
  • Journey to Savannah, Georgia
  • Doctrines, theology and advocacy
  • Advocacy of Arminianism
  • Literary work
  • Commemoration and legacy

Thanks. howcheng {chat} 03:46, 22 May 2017 (UTC)[reply]

Nevertheless, I have read countless Wikipedia entries, and this is one of the best. Even from the perspective of this non-christian, I'm moved. Great writing. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Jason P Jackson (talkcontribs) 12:18, 29 November 2018 (UTC)[reply]

External links modified[edit]

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Added links to Manchester and Chapel-en-le-frith[edit]

Added some links to Manchester and Chapel-en-le-frith including 2 chapels that are attributable to him. Either by virtue of his opening them (Oldham Street Manchester) or Preaching there. Let me know if there are any issues. I am still relatively new to this. RoslinGenetics (talk) 18:26, 17 January 2018 (UTC)[reply]

Contradictory information[edit]

The article states:

"...he married very unhappily at the age of 48 to a widow, Mary Vazeille, described as 'a well-to-do widow and mother of four children.' The couple had no children. Vazeille left him 15 years later. John Singleton writes: 'By 1758 she had left him...'"

If Wesley was 48 when he married, he would have been married in 1751. If Vazeille left him in 1758, she would have left him after 7 years, not 15. Something is wrong here. -Hemarcello (talk) 01:08, 14 August 2018 (UTC)[reply]

Agree to disagree[edit]

Wesley was not the first to put the phrase "agree to disagree" into print. In this blog post I've listed earlier instances from before Wesley and Whitefield: https://wjdw.nl/2019/04/12/was-john-wesley-the-first-to-put-the-phrase-agree-to-disagree-in-print/. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Willemjdewit (talkcontribs) 16:38, 12 April 2019 (UTC)[reply]

Under "Education"[edit]

Under "Education" it says, "In August 1727, after taking his master's degree, Wesley returned to Epworth." I think this should be reworded. Maybe it's different in different parts of the world??? I've never heard of someone "taking" a master's degree before and I'm not sure what this means. Is that when he began pursuing it? Once he earned it?...

Or is it, as I think it is, saying that he physically took the degree he was awarded and then went to Epworth? In that case, if that is still going to be included, I think it would be better to phrase it, "In August 1727 he took his master's degree and returned to Epworth." Thank you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.176.231.124 (talk) 22:30, 3 October 2019 (UTC)[reply]

'Taking' means he studied and completed a degree. I will reword this sentence if it unclear. --Hazhk (talk) 18:45, 14 October 2019 (UTC)[reply]
As I understand it, his first degree was a Bachelor of Arts. Is this simply what it was called at Oxford in 1724? Even Encyclopaedia Britannica gives no further detail. Similarly with his Master of Arts. Martinevans123 (talk) 19:22, 14 October 2019 (UTC)[reply]

Using template:sfn on this article ?[edit]

I propose to use template:sfn for each of the references of this article. My purpose is to improve its quality and to ease the process of translation in different languages. Is there any opposition to this proposal? If not I will process soon. Help is welcome also. ---Telikalive (talk) 12:08, 8 December 2019 (UTC)[reply]

The place of open air preaching.[edit]

I'm always saddened by the caricature that one day George Whitfield woke up and thought I know what, I get on my horse and ride to Kingswood and preach in the open air - and then took Wesley along to see his good idea. That misses an important part of the way in which God works. With the coming of the Restoration to Britain, Baptists were now not to be tolerated. Groups of them fled Bristol, usually before the curfew on Saturday night and walked for miles to the wildlands of the Kingswood coal fields, where the authorities only ventured with caution. They slept in the open air, often in freezing conditions before worshipping together as they believed God wanted them too. They found around them the outcasts of society - miners who were seen as the dregs of the earth - and they shared the message that God loved them when no one else did. It was a perilous thing to do several of their preachers were drowned in the river by the authorities - a fitting fate for re-baptising heretics! The first record of the church where I am now the minister records the whole congregation being arrested and shipped off to jail in Gloucester - the authorities wouldn't risk taking them to Bristol jail for fear of the miners marching into the town to release them. God blessed the work. No they weren't skilled preachers, just ordinary people seeking to do God's will. In a unique way that most people (including Wesley) thought of as being beyond the pale - dishonouring to God. The God send Whitfield, he saw what God was doing through these poor people and was touched. He was a preacher in a different league. He shared it with his friend Wesley, who saw what was happening, and hear God calling him to do this too. The rest as they say, is history. Revival broke out, the world was changed. It was amazing how God had the right people in the right place at the right time, mighty men, but without poor individuals, people like us, following God's call on our lives this could never have happened. Now Hanham Mount where (maybe) Wesley preached is now a Methodist World Heritage site, but the dedication on it is not to Wesley, or Whitfield, but to the Field Preachers of 1658. It is fantastic to know that I can never see the outcome of my poor work for God. He uses the great whose names are remembered, and the unknowns whose names are only written on his hand. On our website under history the story is told more fully - https://www.hanhambaptistchurch.com/resources/HBC1.pdf or if you want source material there are the records of Broadmead Baptist church available on Google Books - https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Ocw6AQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false - Peter Cook — Preceding unsigned comment added by BristolPete (talkcontribs) 14:52, 13 February 2021 (UTC)[reply]

Errors in the Pine and Benson editions of Wesley's Works[edit]

Are the statements that there are errors in these two editions based on any authoritative statement or do they reflect someone's personal opinion? BobKilcoyne (talk) 08:45, 7 August 2021 (UTC)[reply]

Personality and Activites[edit]

The last sentence of the second to the last paragraph in the section "Personality and Activities" quotes John Wesley as saying "I did not forsake her, I did not dismiss her, I will not recall her" and cites this -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wesley#CITEREFWesley2000a -- as the source for this statement. This link does not actually contain the quote in any obvious way. If any searching must be done, I feel that it ought to be noted. Not sure if this is my error in not being able to find it or an error in the quotation itself. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.116.118.208 (talk) 03:46, 6 April 2022 (UTC)[reply]